Myths in Recruiting – Part 2 of Make Better Hiring Decisions

Myth #3: HR Orientation includes all the On-boarding Needed for New Hire Success

 

Many companies spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on complex onboarding plans that all too often require an unrealistic commitment of time and effort from several busy individuals.  One of the foremost myths in recruiting is these “one-size-fits-all” plans ever actually work. The truth is they are rarely successful.  All companies include orientation, but orientation is not actual on-boarding.

Retained executive search consultants are experts in this area as our reputation is dependent on new hire retention.  An on-boarding plan must be simple and easy and require a minimum amount of time.  As the executive recruiter has already defined the team profile and discovered how the new hire’s skills and behavioral traits will impact the team he/she will work within, it is a matter of producing two documents.

Good On-boarding Plans are Not Myths in Recruiting

 

The Personal Action Plan, used by the new hire, right at the start is based on conversations between the new hire and his/her immediate supervisor.  After consultation, the new hire has an action plan to not only meet the objectives of the role he/she were hired into, but provides self-development that will allow for career growth, utilize the new hire’s strengths, and work on their weaknesses.  A second document, the Mentoring and Coaching Plan, is used by the actual Hiring Manager.  It was designed for that new hire, not a “one-size fits-all”.

What is the result of orientation that uses an expensive all-encompassing on-boarding?  Waste of valuable time and little to show for it.  The result of a retained executive search firm’s personalized on-boarding plan?  Streamlined efficient means that results in fast assimilation, quick productivity, and longer retention.

Myth 4:  HR and/or Hiring Managers Should Always Make the Offer

 

Another of the myths in recruiting is that HR makes the offer as that is part of their job function.  Often, we see a hiring manager or HR extend an offer to a candidate who would have helped the manager’s company and career enormously – only to receive a turn down.  In many instances, the offer fails to emphasize the specific elements of the opportunity which are of greatest interest as well as fail to address the aspirations and goals of the candidate.  These quality performers are not actively looking and may need to be “sold.”

Myths in Recruiting and OnboardingIt is so frustrating to watch human resources and hiring managers think that THEIRS is the ideal company, opportunity, and offer and that passive candidates should be 100% sold into the opportunity.  The fact is often HR low balls the offer or insist they be the sole negotiator.  I’ve got news for you – great candidates don’t believe you; they are not going to work for you, and really it is rather insulting to them.

After all they are considering working for the actual hiring manager.  While there are various reasons why good candidates are open to making a change, the fact is that virtually none would be comfortable sharing those concerns with an internal recruiter.  It is extremely frustrating when an executive recruiter must come in to save the day on a turn down.  It’s gotten to the point that at NextGen we simply will not accept a loss and insist in our contract that we make the offer and close.

Professional recruiters have great expertise in developing in-depth individual relationships with the candidates they present. As part of a professional recruiter’s service, they will provide the candidate’s primary motivators to making a move – and by advising the client on the compensation plan in the offer and making the offer verbally acting as the go-between thereby reduce or eliminate turn downs, and assure the manager of securing the best talent available.

 

Who Makes the Employment Offer – Myths in Recruiting

 

While companies do experienced turn downs, retained executive recruiters rarely do. We know what it will take to get the offer signed and when a candidate appears unreasonable, retained search forms have the experience and skill set to pull the offer when needed and get the candidate won over by addressing their concerns,

In the final part of this series, we’ll look at the biggest in the myths of recruiting, which is that executive search, specifically retained search fees are too expensive.  In that article, we actually lay out why recruitment fees based on performance and delivery by the search firm, the hire, and the success of a hire that meets or exceeds the objectives of the role is far more cost effective than any other means with the rare exception of a great referral.

 

About Charles Moore

Managing Partner | Retained Executive Search Consultant with 25+ years recruiting senior executives and functional leaders in Artificial Intelligence, Data Science, Augmented Reality, Digital Transformation, Wireless Infrastructure, RF Components, and IoT data, devices, networks.

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